Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Further Excellent Links (Truth about Royalties, New Guinean Lawsuits, Middlemay, and Where Not to Sit on a Hot Day)

Wanna know what royalties on a NYT bestseller really break down to? Good, honest post with a real live royalty statement posted here.

Also, Travis Erwin found this painfully excellent story about a guy who got trapped by his beach balls. I don't mean the plastic ones.

Remember that bestseller GUNS, GERMS, STEEL? Yeah, well, now the author, Jared Diamond, is being sued by the New Guinea tribe he wrote about so "lovingly." Well, actually, his publisher The New Yorker is. Heehee. I find this very funny. Although I bet The New Yorker doesn't. Via Gawker.

And finally for today, I'll bet I can guess three things about you:

1) You've never read George Eliot's Middlemarch
2) You always thought you should have read it and felt vaguely guilty that you know you'll never get around to it
3) You really, really want to join Middlemay!! Middlemay is an 8-week online book club in which at least 6 of us are going to read Middlemarch in enstallments over the months of May and June. Check out the breakdown here, and join us! Brought to you by the Fill-in-the-Gaps Project, which now has more than 30 participants!.

26 comments:

PurpleClover said...

NICE. Bring them all over to read my silly comments. Thanks.

I did read the post about the beach balls...HILARIOUS! The funny thing is we just learned all about how stuff like this happens this semester. I could write a whole blog post and the stuff we learned about what predicaments people get themselves into.

I also read the royalty statement...very enlightening!

PurpleClover said...

Sorry my grammar/flow was atrocious. But I did just finish a second glass of vino. Please forgive.

Stephan Alexander Scharnberg said...

I have read George Eliot's "Middlemarch"--twice actually. Once in Grade 12 English class, and once somewhere in the early 1990s.

angelle said...

effin. that royalty thing is mildly depressing.

Gina Black said...

Middlemay! What a great idea. I have never read MIDDLEMARCH, but just watched the BBC production with Rufus Sewell (ahem). When I saw this I wandered over to Amazon and discovered I could DL it to my Kindle for $0.00. Truly.

So I'm in.

Kim Kasch said...

Cold water, warm sun the two usually go together . . . unless you plan on skinny dipping and sleeping, oh yeah, and you're a guy

;-)

Ann Victor said...

very interestin to read about the royalty statement...remind me agian why we continue writing?

And, having just returned from beautiful Croatia I feel truly sympathetic to poor,poor Mario and his beach experience. My dh just winced.

Ann Victor said...

Sorry for mistakes. It's early here and I'm running late with morning chores (Blogging instead of preparing breakfast for dh!) :O

I_am_Tulsa said...

I own Middlemarch! I own a copy! I own...so, obviously you have been going through my head because I own it but haven't read it...I'm in too!

Rick Daley said...

Thank you!

moonrat said...

Haha. Stephan, you win. I knew NOTHING about you at all!!

re: Middlemay: so glad! Yay!

Colorado Writer said...

I was getting some books together for the library sale and came across my old musty copy of Middlemarch from the college days. I tossed it in the box. But, I suppose I could hang on to it for another ten years.

Christine Fletcher said...

Middlemarch--my favorite novel of all time. Yay for more Middlemarch readers! You all are going to love it.

Now, if only there was a month devoted to Les Miserables...

Susan Adrian said...

HA! You are wrong. I read MIDDLEMARCH in highschool.

(I did not like it, mind, but I slogged...er, read the whole thing.) :)

Enjoy Middlemay. I'll be joining you when you get to ShakespeareJune (or something)

Linda said...

Ah... MIDDLEMARCH... May I join you? It IS on my Top 50 Gap list (haven't posted yet, scrabbled in a notebook). And my life eases so much in about a week. Tonight I'll post on Emily's blog... if the celebration vino (end-of-week, nothing stellar like snagging an agent) and Survivor don't do me in first.

Peace, linda

writtenwyrdd said...

George Elliot? No thank you. Read her in college, and if I had to do it again I'd slit my wrists first I swear.

As for the beach balls, I laughed so hard when I read that yesterday it disrupted the office. And having had a good half dozen emergency room nurses for friends, I have heard some wacky tales of Stupid Human Tricks. The one Travis shared is pretty much top of the list, though.

Emily Cross said...

MR - we are now official at 50 members for the 'fill in the gap' blog. Wahooo!!!

only 50 more places left. . . . ;)

Janet said...

LOL.

1) Wrong.
2) Autmatically wrong because of 1)
3) Maybe.

Precie said...

:)

I heart you, moonie. I'll be hunkered down in final grading mode until around May 20th. But I might pop in after my brain recovers for a teensy bit of Middlemay.

Rachel Hoff said...

Sorry MR; I read Middlemarch already--very long plane trip. I don't remember enjoying it so much that I'd want to do it again. But maybe the next time you do one of these?

claireee said...

i believe i have warned you re: middlemarch before. x

BuffySquirrel said...

That libel case is fraught with implications for journalism.

Jolie said...

I DO want to join Middlemay! I do, I do!

Anonymous said...

Ahhh, Middlemarch. It's a shame teachers force this novel onto high-schoolers: the novel demands to be read by more mature readers who have experienced something of long-term relationships (esp. marriage without an easy escape clause), the withering away of a fierce ideal, discovering that one's own self has become a sell-out, a certain bewilderment about the difference between who we thought we would be and who we became, and all the while, in the background, our village life and values are being erased by the industrial machine of progress.

So it's not for nothing that Virginia Woolf famously described the novel as "one of the few English novels written for grown-ups." Most scholars, actually, consider Middlemarch THE greatest of all the English novels. I'm a professor of nineteenth-century British literature, and I do, too! The novel is one of the few nineteenth-century works to BEGIN with a marriage...instead of ending with a "happily-ever-after" wedding. Not even Austen thought of that!!

Middlemarch is one of the great 10-year novels: you gotta reread it every 10 years as your life experiences change...

Whew! Thanks for letting me GUSH!
Cheers, Tamilyn

Travis Erwin said...

Thanks for the linkage. Some things just beg to be written about.

Matilda McCloud said...

I had to read Middlemarch twice in college. I barely got through it (same with Bleak House). Good luck!